Phonemic Awareness Cards (Coming Soon)

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Phonemic Awareness Cards from BayTreeBlog.com

Table of Contents

*S=segmenting, B=blending

Introduction

Dear educator or parent,

If you’re reading this, chances are good that there is at least one young person in your life who needs help identifying and working with phonemes.

Our Phonemic Awareness Cards can open up a whole world of great games that enhance learning this essential skill. Nothing engages kids better than games, and once you have student buy-in, teaching becomes so much easier. So, let’s have fun while learning an essential skill!

If you would like a quick refresher on phonemes, you may enjoy this video here. Also, in case you missed the post, Do You Make These Three Mistakes Teaching Phonemic Awareness?, this is a good place to start for some straightforward phonemic awareness teaching tips.

Phonemic Awareness Cards include two decks of playing cards. One deck of cards features words that begin with continuous sounds (like /m/ and /f/) and the other deck features words that begin with stop sounds (like /t/ and /k/). Continuous sounds at the beginning of words will be easier to sound out since you can elongate their pronunciation without distortion. Both decks include:

  • 48 picture cards numbered 1 through 12 and grouped by color: red, blue, yellow, and green
  • 4 WILD cards
  • 2 information cards

There are two categories of games: Segmenting (breaking apart) and Blending (combining) phonemes. These games can be played in lots of places: at home or in the clinic or tutoring center.

Each set of cards includes a web URL <www.BayTreeBlog.com/PACdirections> which takes you right back here where you can view the instructional videos (below) and the text directions to play ten different phonemic awareness games. If you like, instructions can be printed for repeated use.

We hope that Phonemic Awareness Cards become a go-to resource in your teaching toolbox for years to come. From Segmenting Slap to Card Blending Bingo, these games capture kids’ attention in a way that practice alone cannot.

To get your own set of cards, just visit our online store. We think you will enjoy these. If you’ve already purchased a set of Phonemic Awareness Cards, thank you!

We encourage and value feedback. Please let us know how you are using our games.

We are committed to providing parents and other teachers with top-quality instructional tools. If you aren’t completely satisfied with these games, just contact us for a full refund (including return shipping cost).

In learning,

Anne-Marie and Ross Morey

Founders
BayTreeBlog.com

Game-Playing And Teaching Tips

1. Have fun! If you’re having fun, your student or child will have fun. You set the tone for the activity.

2. Limit players. When you use the cards as a teaching tool, limit the number of players. For maximum learning effect, maximize the student’s practice time.

3. Limit extra rules. Adding new twists to a game can be lots of fun – when the student is ready. Adding rules too soon will only tax working memory, and that makes games less fun.

4. Seeing is believing. We’ve created bonus, instructional videos for all our games so that you can see them in action while you and the student are learning the rules.

5. Stop sounds second. When learning how to identify and use phonemes, it’s a good idea to learn continuous sounds (like /m/ and /f/) first. Then teach stop sounds (like /t/ and /k/).

6. Teach Don’t Test. When a student makes a mistake, provide corrective feedback. Then give the student another chance. In this way, students develop mastery through repeated practice.

7. Explain, Model, and Practice. Actions like “slapping cards” or “shouting words” should be explained, modeled, and practiced before a game starts to help students know the correct way to do these actions. This way we set students up for success.

8. Short phonemes. When you practice phonemic awareness skills with your student or child, be sure your phonemes are crisp and clear. Extra vowel sounds are a confusing. Here’s a quick video demonstration.

Click Here To Download Game Directions

Game Directions

1) Segmenting Slap

This game is modeled after the traditional card game Slapjack.

DECKS
1 or 2

SKILLS
Segmenting

PLAYERS
2-8

OBJECTIVE
The game is over when one player wins all the cards.

SETUP
If you have four or more players, use two decks.

The dealer divides the cards evenly between players. Each player places her cards in a face-down pile in front of her.

PLAY
The player to the dealer’s left begins. She *turns over the top card of her deck and places it in the center of the table creating a discard pile. She names the image on the card. Then she says each sound in the word.

“Cat”

“/c/ /a/ /t/”

*A note about turning over cards. When placing cards in the discard pile, players should turn cards over away from themselves so that they don’t have the advantage of seeing the card image first.

If the card turned over is WILD, players rush to slap their hand on top of the face-up pile. The first person to slap the cards takes the whole pile adds the cards to the bottom of her deck. The player who takes the cards then leads the first card in the new discard pile. When more than one player slaps a WILD card, the player whose hand is lowest to the table and touching the face-up pile gets to take the cards.

If a player slaps the wrong card, she must give one card from her face-down pile to the player whose card she slapped.

If playing with three or more people, when a player runs out of cards she may slap back into the game by being the first player to place her hand on a WILD card.

VARIATIONS
Doubles
To create even more excitement, the game can be modified to include the slapping of doubles. If a card with a cat picture is played followed by a card with the same image, players may slap the double the same way they would slap a WILD card.

Doubles with Head Touch
This silly variation is the same as Doubles, but players must touch their head before they can slap a double. If they forget, the pile is divided among the other players.

2) Blending Bingo

This game is modeled after the traditional game Card Bingo.

DECKS
1

SKILLS
Blending, or Segmenting (see variation)

PLAYERS
2 (student and adult). See variation for more players.

OBJECTIVE
The first player to turn over three cards in a row (horizontal, vertical, or diagonal) is the winner.

SETUP
Use either deck of Phonemic Awareness Cards. Remove the WILD cards and separate the striped cards from the polka-dot cards. Similarly, you can sort blue/yellow cards from red/green cards for the same result:

Deal nine striped cards to both players, and set the remaining striped cards aside. Each player lays his cards face-up in a 3×3 matrix. The polka-dot cards are placed in a face-down pile in front of the caller (teacher).

PLAY
The caller (teacher) draws the first polka-dot card. She says the three individual sounds out loud. For example, if the picture was a cat, the caller would say, “What word says /c/ /a/ /t/?” The student responds “/c/ /a/ /t/ says cat.” If either player (student or teacher) has a cat picture card in his BINGO array, he turns that card face down.

VARIATIONS
Blackout
The first player to turn over all of his cards is the winner.

Three to Five Players
This fun variation for groups requires a bit more set up and clean up. Combine both decks of Phonemic Awareness Cards. Remove the WILD cards and separate the striped cards from the polka-dot cards. Game play is the same except that students take turns practicing their blending and listening to other players practice. The caller (teacher) should move clockwise through the students e.g. “OK Jimmy, this one is for you. What word says /c/ /a/ /t/?”

Segmenting
Instead of calling cards, the teacher can reveal cards to the student, who then says each sound in the word e.g. “Cat, /c/ /a/ /t/.” If either player (student or teacher) has a cat picture card in his BINGO array, he turns that card face down.

3) WILD Segmenting

This game is modeled after the traditional card game Crazy Eights.

DECKS
1

SKILLS
Segmenting

PLAYERS
2-4

OBJECTIVE
The first player to discard all the cards from her hand is the winner! If no player is able to discard all her cards, players score penalty points based on the number of cards remaining in their hands. Wild cards are worth fifty points. All other cards are worth their number value.

SETUP
Using either deck of Phonemic Awareness Cards, deal seven cards face-down to each player and place the remaining cards face down in the middle of the table. These face-down cards become the stock pile. Turn the top card of the stock pile over and place it face-up beside the pile. This face-up card becomes the discard pile. The first card in the discard pile must not be a WILD card. If a WILD card is turned over, replace the WILD card randomly into the stock pile and choose another card from the top.

PLAY
Beginning to the dealer’s left and moving clockwise, each player must choose to discard a card or draw a card from the stock.

If the card at the top of discard pile is not WILD, the player may discard any card matching either the number or number-color of the card at the top of the discard pile. For example, if a blue 7 was on top of the discard pile, the player could discard a 7 of any color or any blue-numbered card. After discarding, the player says the name of the image on the card and sounds out the phonemes e.g. “Cat, /c/ /a/ /t/.”

A WILD card may be played on top of a card of any number or number-color. The player who played the WILD card must name the next number-color, e.g. blue, green, red, or yellow.

If the card at the top of the discard pile is a WILD card, the player must play a card of the number-color named by the previous player or she may choose to play another WILD card.

If a player cannot play, she must draw a card from the stock pile as long as cards remain. If the stock pile becomes depleted, the player must pass instead of drawing a card, and play continues as usual.

VARIATIONS
Draw Two Cards
When a number-2 card is played, the next player must draw two cards instead of taking their normal turn.

Last Card
When a player has only one remaining card in her hand, she must alert other players.

4) Concentration Segmenting

This game is modeled after the traditional card game Memory.

DECKS
1

SKILLS
Segmenting

PLAYERS
1-6

OBJECTIVE
The game is over when all the pairs have been matched and removed.

For one player, Concentration Segmenting is a timed game. The goal is to see how quickly one can find and remove all of the matching pairs.

For two or more players, after all the pairs have been discovered and claimed, the player with the most cards is the winner.

SETUP
Shuffle all cards from either deck of Phonemic Awareness Cards and place them face-down on the table in a 4 x 13 matrix.

PLAY
The player to the dealer’s left begins by turning over one of the face-down cards on the table. The player then says the name of the image on the card and sounds out the phonemes e.g. “Cat, /c/ /a/ /t/.” The same player then turns over a second card and in the same manner sounds out the phonemes. If the card images match (i.e. both cards display a cat picture), he gets to keep the pair of cards and take another turn. If the cards do not match, he must turn them face-down again, and his turn is over. Moving clockwise, the next player takes his turn in a similar fashion.

VARIATIONS
Blending
The player whose turn it is (we’ll call him the active player) points to the card he’d like to select, and the player to his left (becoming the caller) picks up the card without showing the picture and says the phonemes out loud. For example, if the picture was a cat, the caller would say, “What word says /c/ /a/ /t/?” The active player would respond “/c/ /a/ /t/ says cat.” The caller then returns the card face-up to the spot where he picked it up, and the active player selects another card in the same manner. Alternately, if more than one student is playing, the teacher/parent can function as the caller for all of the students.

Deck Duel (Two players, just for fun)
One player plays using the Stop Sounds deck races against an opponent playing at the same time using the Continuous Sounds Deck. This can be fun, but it’s difficult to practice segmenting when playing the game this way!

NOTES
During game setup, it can be fun to let the student(s) arrange the cards in a face-down pattern of her choice.

5) Fishing for Phonemes

This game is modeled after the traditional card game Go Fish.

DECKS
1

SKILLS
Segmenting & Blending

PLAYERS
2-6

OBJECTIVE
The game is over when all the cards have been paired. Players count the number of pairs they’ve collected. The player with the most pairs wins!

SETUP
Remove the WILD cards from the either deck of Phonemic Awareness Cards. If there are two or three players, deal seven face-down cards to each player. If there are four or more players, deal five face-down cards to each player. Place the remaining cards face-down in the center of the table creating the stock pile.

PLAY
Players compete to collect pairs of cards with matching images e.g. two cards with a cat picture. Before the game begins, players set aside any paired cards in their hands.

The player with the most pairs goes first. If there is a tie, the player with the most pairs to the dealer’s left begins.

Player #1 begins by asking any other player for a card. For example, “Tom, do you have a card that says /c/ /a/ /t/?” The asking player can only request a card she already has in her hand.

If Tom doesn’t have the card, he says, “No, I don’t have a CAT card. Go fish.” Player #1 then draws a card from the stock and the player to her left takes his turn next.

If Tom has the card, he responds, “Yes, I do have a CAT card,” and hands player one the card. Player #1 sets aside her pair of cat cards and continues her turn by asking any other player for a specific card. Her turn is over when she asks for a card, and the other player responds, “Go fish.”

At any time, if a player has fewer cards than a full hand (either five or seven cards, see SETUP) she may draw from the stock until her hand is replenished.

When the stock becomes depleted, play continues without any cards being drawn. If a player is out of cards, and the stock is empty, she must watch until the game is over.

VARIATIONS

Segmenting Only
If students aren’t ready for blending “fishers” can lay down the card their looking for and ask, “Cat. /c/ /a/ /t/. Do you have any cat cards?” The asked player responds yes or no, and play continues.

6) Phoneme Fight

This game is modeled after the traditional card game War.

DECKS
1

SKILLS
Segmenting

PLAYERS
2 (or more, see variation)

OBJECTIVE
The game is over when either player has won all the cards.

SETUP
Remove the WILD cards from the either deck of Phonemic Awareness Cards. Split the deck evenly in two. Each player receives half (twenty four cards) and places the cards in a face-down pile in front of him.

PLAY
The player sitting to the dealer’s left begins by placing the top card from his pile in the center of the table. He then says the name of the image on the card and sounds out the phonemes e.g. “Cat, /c/ /a/ /t/.”

Player two follows in the same manner. The player who reveals the higher-ranked card wins both face-up cards and adds them to the bottom of his face-down pile. For example, a 9 outranks a 3.

If the revealed cards are evenly ranked, then there is a battle. Both players play a second card face-down and a third card face-up. As before, players say the name of the image on the revealed card and sound out the phonemes e.g. “Cat, /c/ /a/ /t/.” After players have compared the ranks of their newly-revealed cards, the player with the higher-ranked card wins all six cards (four face-up cards and two face-down cards) adding them to the bottom of his pile. If the newly-revealed cards are evenly ranked once again, the battle continues in the same manner (both players playing two more cards, one face-down and one face-up) as long as the revealed cards continue to be equal.

VARIATIONS
More than two players
Split the deck evenly between all players. If two players reveal evenly-ranked cards, all players participate in the battle until there is one clear winner. If a player runs out of cards, the game continues until one player has all the cards.

7) Phonem-a-sauraus

This game is modeled after the traditional card game Animals.

DECKS
1

SKILLS
Segmenting

PLAYERS
2-6

OBJECTIVE
The game is over when the deck runs out. The player with the most cards is the winner.

SETUP
Each player chooses a goofy animal name e.g. “Zebrasaurus” or “Buffalobster.”

Remove the WILD cards from either deck of phonemic awareness cards.

PLAY
Moving clockwise, the dealer places one card at a time in face-up piles in front of each player. Players, in turn, say the name of the image on the revealed card in front of them and sound out the phonemes e.g. “Cat, /c/ /a/ /t/.” If at any time, two players’ piles are showing a card of the same number, those two players must quickly call out the animal name of the other player. The first player to correctly name the other player’s animal, takes his opponent’s cards and adds them to the bottom of his own pile.

For example, if Player #3 and Player #1 have 7-cards on top of their piles, and Player #1 shouts “Hippopotomuskrat” before Player #3 can shout “Flamingoat,” Player #1 takes Player #3’s cards and adds them to his pile.

NOTES
This game can be played with as few as two players, but is even more fun with three or more players. If you’re playing this game with one child, let him be dealer and practice the segmenting for both of you.

8) Tic Tac Toe: Three Sounds In A Row!

This game is modeled after the traditional game Tic Tac Toe.

DECKS
2

SKILLS
Segmenting (or Blending, see variation)

PLAYERS
2

OBJECTIVE
Players place cards on the game board grid, trying to complete for a vertical, horizontal, or diagonal row of their own-colored cards. The first player to make an uninterrupted row is the winner!

SETUP
Print a 3×3 playing board at BayTreeBlog.com/TicTacTemplate.

Both decks of phonemic awareness cards are used in this game. Each player gets her own deck (either red/yellow-backed or blue/green-backed).

Each player removes the WILD cards from her deck, shuffles the deck, and places the deck face-down in front of her.

Players can flip a coin or draw high card to see who goes first.

PLAY
Player #1 turns over the top card of her deck and places it on a square of her choosing on the board. She then says the name of the card image and sounds out the phonemes (e.g. “Cat, /c/ /a/ /t/”), and turns the card face-down revealing the colored back of the card.

Player #2 follows in the same manner.

The game continues until either player gets 3 of their own colored cards in a row or the game ends in a draw.

VARIATIONS
Blending
Instead of drawing a card and immediately playing/revealing the image, players draw a card, look at the image, and say the phonemes out loud. Their opponent must blend the sounds together before the card can be played. For example, Susan draws a card, looks at the image (of a cat), and says, “/c/ /a/ /t/.” Her opponent, Michael, says, “/c/ /a/ /t/ says cat.” Susan then places her card on a square of her choosing on the grid.

9) Winner Goes WILD!

This game is modeled after the traditional card game Old Maid.

DECKS
1

SKILLS
Segmenting

PLAYERS
2+

OBJECTIVE
The player holding the WILD card after all other cards have been discarded is the winner!

SETUP
Remove all the WILD cards from the deck except for one. Deal all the cards evenly between the players.

PLAY
Players begin the game by discarding any cards in their hand that have matching images.

Every time a player discards a pair of matching cards, he places the cards face-up in front of him and says the name of the card image and sounds out the phonemes (e.g. “Cat, /c/ /a/ /t/”).

The player sitting left of the dealer begins by fanning his cards face-down towards the player on his left (let’s call him Player #2) who picks one card and adds it to his hand. If Player #2 now has a matching pair of cards, he discards the pair. Moving clockwise, Player #2 now offers his hand face-down to the next player, and the game continues until all cards except the lone WILD card have been discarded.

10) Segmenting Sevens

This game is modeled after the traditional card game Sevens.

DECKS
1

SKILLS
Segmenting

OBJECTIVE
The first player to lay down all his cards is the winner!

PLAYERS
3-7, 4+ recommended

SETUP
Remove the WILD cards from either deck of Phonemic Awareness Cards, and deal the cards evenly to all players, beginning on the dealer’s left.

PLAY
As they’re played, cards are laid out on the table in four rows, one on top of the other, by color (red, green, blue, and yellow). Each colored row starts with a 7-card in the middle and ascends to the right (towards 12) and descends to the left (towards 1). See the layout below:

The game begins by the player on the dealer’s left playing a 7. Every time a player plays a card he says the name of the card image and sounds out the phonemes (e.g. “Cat, /c/ /a/ /t/”).

If the first player doesn’t have a 7, play passes to the next player. Players must play if they are able, but may pass if they are unable to play.

Unless playing a seven, players may only build on cards that have already been played i.e. only once a 7 has been played may 6 or 8 of that color be played.

Once a player lays down a card or passes, his turn is over, and play passes clockwise to the left.

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